Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   32 times

I'm running a PHP script in a cronjob and I want to send emails every 5 minutes

My current (crontab) cronjob:

10 * * * * /usr/bin/php /mydomain.in/cromail.php > /dev/null 2>&1

The cronmail.php is as follows:

<?php
$from = 'D'; // sender
$subject = 'S';
$message = 'M';
$message = wordwrap($message, 70);
mail("myemail@gmail.com", $subject, $message, "From: $fromn");
?>

But I've not received an email in 30 minutes with this configuration.

 Answers

30

In a crontab file, the fields are:

  • minute of the hour.
  • hour of the day.
  • day of the month.
  • month of the year.
  • day of the week.

So:

10 * * * * blah

means execute blah at 10 minutes past every hour.

If you want every five minutes, use either:

*/5 * * * * blah

meaning every minute but only every fifth one, or:

0,5,10,15,20,25,30,35,40,45,50,55 * * * * blah

for older cron executables that don't understand the */x notation.

If it still seems to be not working after that, change the command to something like:

date >>/tmp/debug_cron_pax.txt

and monitor that file to ensure something's being written every five minutes. If so, there's something wrong with your PHP scripts. If not, there's something wrong with your cron daemon.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
SilverHorn
answered 7 Months ago
53

You could use this class PHP-Parse-cron-strings-and-compute-schedules

It'll also compute the last scheduled run

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
Classified
answered 7 Months ago
11
$filename = dirname(__FILE__) . "/online_users.txt";
Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
pwaring
answered 7 Months ago
74

The task must be configured in two steps.

First you create a simple task that start at 0:00, every day. Then, you go in Advanced... (or similar depending on the operating system you are on) and select the Repeat every X minutes option for 24 hours.

The key here is to find the advanced properties. If you are using the XP wizard, it will only offer you to launch the advanced dialog once you created the task.

On more recent versions of Windows (7+ I think?):

  1. Double click the task and a property window will show up.
  2. Click the Triggers tab.
  3. Double click the trigger details and the Edit Trigger window will show up.
  4. Under Advanced settings panel, tick Repeat task every xxx minutes, and set Indefinitely if you need.
  5. Finally, click ok.
Friday, June 4, 2021
 
michele
answered 5 Months ago
50

The solution you will use really depends on how long you need to wait between each execution of your function.

If you are waiting for longer than 10 minutes, I would suggest using AlarmManager.

// Some time when you want to run
Date when = new Date(System.currentTimeMillis());

try {
    Intent someIntent = new Intent(someContext, MyReceiver.class); // intent to be launched

    // Note: this could be getActivity if you want to launch an activity
    PendingIntent pendingIntent = PendingIntent.getBroadcast(
        context,
        0, // id (optional)
        someIntent, // intent to launch
        PendingIntent.FLAG_CANCEL_CURRENT // PendingIntent flag
    );

    AlarmManager alarms = (AlarmManager) context.getSystemService(
        Context.ALARM_SERVICE
    );

    alarms.setRepeating(
        AlarmManager.RTC_WAKEUP,
        when.getTime(),
        AlarmManager.INTERVAL_FIFTEEN_MINUTES,
        pendingIntent
    );
} catch(Exception e) {
    e.printStackTrace();
}

Once you have broadcasted the above Intent, you can receive your Intent by implementing a BroadcastReceiver. Note that this will need to be registered either in your application manifest or via the context.registerReceiver(receiver, intentFilter); method. For more information on BroadcastReceiver's please refer to the official documentation..

public class MyReceiver extends BroadcastReceiver {
    @Override
    public void onReceive(Context context, Intent intent)
    {
        System.out.println("MyReceiver: here!") // Do your work here
    }
}

If you are waiting for shorter than 10 minutes then I would suggest using a Handler.

final Handler handler = new Handler();
final int delay = 1000; // 1000 milliseconds == 1 second

handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
    public void run() {
        System.out.println("myHandler: here!"); // Do your work here
        handler.postDelayed(this, delay);
    }
}, delay);
Saturday, June 5, 2021
 
rorymorris
answered 5 Months ago
Only authorized users can answer the question. Please sign in first, or register a free account.
Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged :