Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   34 times

I want to get todays date given a time zone in Paul Eggert format(America/New_York) in PHP?

 Answers

84

The other answers set the timezone for all dates in your system. This doesn't always work well if you want to support multiple timezones for your users.

Here's the short version:

<?php
$date = new DateTime("now", new DateTimeZone('America/New_York') );
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Works in PHP >= 5.2.0

List of supported timezones: php.net/manual/en/timezones.php


Here's a version with an existing time and setting timezone by a user setting

<?php

$usersTimezone = 'America/New_York';
$date = new DateTime( 'Thu, 31 Mar 2011 02:05:59 GMT', new DateTimeZone($usersTimezone) );
echo $date->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Here is a more verbose version to show the process a little more clearly

<?php

// Date for a specific date/time:
$date = new DateTime('Thu, 31 Mar 2011 02:05:59 GMT');

// Output date (as-is)
echo $date->format('l, F j Y g:i:s A');     

// Output line break (for testing)
echo "n<br />n";

// Example user timezone (to show it can be used dynamically)
$usersTimezone = 'America/New_York';

// Convert timezone
$tz = new DateTimeZone($usersTimezone);
$date->setTimeZone($tz);

// Output date after 
echo $date->format('l, F j Y g:i:s A');

Libraries

  • Carbon — A very popular date library.
  • Chronos — A drop-in replacement for Carbon focused on immutability. See below on why that's important.
  • jenssegers/date — An extension of Carbon that adds multi-language support.

I'm sure there are a number of other libraries available, but these are a few I'm familiar with.


Bonus Lesson: Immutable Date Objects

While you're here, let me save you some future headache. Let's say you want to calculate 1 week from today and 2 weeks from today. You might write some code like:

<?php

// Create a datetime (now, in this case 2017-Feb-11)
$today = new DateTime();

echo $today->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo "---n<br>";

$oneWeekFromToday = $today->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('7 days'));
$twoWeeksFromToday = $today->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('14 days'));

echo $today->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo $oneWeekFromToday->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo $twoWeeksFromToday->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo "n<br>";

The output:

2017-02-11 
--- 
2017-03-04 
2017-03-04 
2017-03-04

Hmmmm... That's not quite what we wanted. Modifying a traditional DateTime object in PHP not only returns the updated date but modifies the original object as well.

This is where DateTimeImmutable comes in.

$today = new DateTimeImmutable();

echo $today->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo "---n<br>";

$oneWeekFromToday = $today->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('7 days'));
$twoWeeksFromToday = $today->add(DateInterval::createFromDateString('14 days'));

echo $today->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo $oneWeekFromToday->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";
echo $twoWeeksFromToday->format('Y-m-d') . "n<br>";

The output:

2017-02-11 
--- 
2017-02-11 
2017-02-18 
2017-02-25 

In this second example, we get the dates we expected back. By using DateTimeImmutable instead of DateTime, we prevent accidental state mutations and prevent potential bugs.

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
zhartaunik
answered 7 Months ago
64

If you derive all your objects from a TrackableObject class, this class could be set up to handle such things (just be sure you call parent::__construct() and parent::__destruct() when overloading those in subclasses.

class TrackableObject
{
    protected static $_instances = array();

    public function __construct()
    {
        self::$_instances[] = $this;
    }

    public function __destruct()
    {
        unset(self::$_instances[array_search($this, self::$_instances, true)]);
    }

    /**
     * @param $includeSubclasses Optionally include subclasses in returned set
     * @returns array array of objects
     */
    public static function getInstances($includeSubclasses = false)
    {
        $return = array();
        foreach(self::$_instances as $instance) {
            if ($instance instanceof get_class($this)) {
                if ($includeSubclasses || (get_class($instance) === get_class($this)) {
                    $return[] = $instance;
                }
            }
        }
        return $return;
    }
}

The major issue with this is that no object would be automatically picked up by garbage collection (as a reference to it still exists within TrackableObject::$_instances), so __destruct() would need to be called manually to destroy said object. (Circular Reference Garbage Collection was added in PHP 5.3 and may present additional garbage collection opportunities)

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
dirigibleplum
answered 7 Months ago
36
>>> import time
>>> timestamp = 1284375159
>>> time.strftime("%m %d %Y",time.localtime(timestamp))
'09 13 2010'
Saturday, May 29, 2021
 
aurelijusv
answered 5 Months ago
51

You can use the datetime object or their function aliases for this:

Example (abridged from PHP Manual)

date_default_timezone_set('Europe/London');

$datetime = new DateTime('2008-08-03 12:35:23');
echo $datetime->format('Y-m-d H:i:s') . "n";
$la_time = new DateTimeZone('America/Los_Angeles');
$datetime->setTimezone($la_time);
echo $datetime->format('Y-m-d H:i:s');

Edit regarding comments

but i cannt use this method because i need to show date in different time zones as the user login from different locations

That's not a problem. When a user logs in, you determine his timezone and set it to your DateTime object just like shown. I'm using a similar approach in one of my projects and it works like a charm.

in the database i need to get the dates in any single timezone, then only it can be processed properly

You store the time either as a timestamp or a datetime in one timezone. When you query a DateTime field, you either convert the time in a DateTime object to this timezone or - if your db supports it - query with the selected timezone.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
eek
answered 5 Months ago
eek
40

I got the solution, so i would like to share

Actually I have set default timezone in config.inc.php file as below

date_default_timezone_set('America/Los_Angeles');

then I check the current time and timezone of MySQL server from phpmyadmin with below query

SELECT NOW(), SYSDATE(), @@global.time_zone , @@session.time_zone , 
      TIMEDIFF( NOW( ) , CONVERT_TZ( NOW( ) , @@session.time_zone ,  '+00:00' )) 
      AS OFFSET

This return the OFFSET value +05:30

solution steps:

  • First I changed the timezone of mySQL Server to GMT/UTC +00:00 ( I have super privilage on mySQL server)

    SET GLOBAL time_zone = '+00:00';  
    
  • We save the date and time using start_date = NOW() ( column datatype: DATETIME )

Now there is 2 way to get date and time as per user's timezone (America/Denver)

first method ( using PHP DateTime)

 /*
   * first set timezone as GMT.
   * This is MUST because default timezone is differ from user timezone  
  */     
    $gmt = new DateTimeZone('GMT');
    $user_tz = 'America/Denver';
    $st = new DateTime($row[`start_date`], $gmt);
    // now set user timezone
    $st->setTimezone($user_tz );
    $stime = $qt->format('r');
    echo $stime;

second method (using MySQL UNIX_TIMESTAMP)

#$retrieve data from server in timestamp
$qry = "SELECT `start_date`,UNIX_TIMESTAMP(`start_date`) AS sTimestamp FROM..."  
$st = new DateTime('@'.$row['sTimestamp ']);                     
$stime = $st->format('r');
echo $stime;
                  

Note : dont change start_date to timestamp with strtotime(). It will return different value from the UNIX_TIMESTAMP() i.e.

 strtotime($row['start_date']) !== $row['sTimestamp']
Saturday, August 7, 2021
 
Alix
answered 3 Months ago
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