Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   23 times

How do I use a progress bar when my script is doing some task that is likely to take time?

For example, a function which takes some time to complete and returns True when done. How can I display a progress bar during the time the function is being executed?

Note that I need this to be in real time, so I can't figure out what to do about it. Do I need a thread for this? I have no idea.

Right now I am not printing anything while the function is being executed, however a progress bar would be nice. Also I am more interested in how this can be done from a code point of view.

 Answers

77

There are specific libraries (like this one here) but maybe something very simple would do:

import time
import sys

toolbar_width = 40

# setup toolbar
sys.stdout.write("[%s]" % (" " * toolbar_width))
sys.stdout.flush()
sys.stdout.write("b" * (toolbar_width+1)) # return to start of line, after '['

for i in xrange(toolbar_width):
    time.sleep(0.1) # do real work here
    # update the bar
    sys.stdout.write("-")
    sys.stdout.flush()

sys.stdout.write("]n") # this ends the progress bar

Note: progressbar2 is a fork of progressbar which hasn't been maintained in years.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
Axalix
answered 7 Months ago
27

python3 is not Python syntax, it is the Python binary itself, the thing you run to get to the interactive interpreter.

You are confusing the command line with the Python prompt. Open a console (Windows) or terminal (Linux, Mac), the same place you'd use dir or ls to explore your filesystem from the command line.

If you are typing at a >>> or In [number]: prompt you are in the wrong place, that's the Python interpreter itself and it only takes Python syntax. If you started the Python prompt from a command line, exit at this point and go back to the command line. If you started the interpreter from IDLE or in an IDE, then you need to open a terminal or console as a separate program.

Other programs that people often confuse for Python syntax; each of these is actually a program to run in your command prompt:

  • python, python2.7, python3.5, etc.
  • pip or pip3
  • virtualenv
  • ipython
  • easy_install
  • django-admin
  • conda
  • flask
  • scrapy
  • setup.py -- this is a script you need to run with python setup.py [...].
  • Any of the above together with sudo.

with many more variations possible depending on what tools and libraries you have installed and what you are trying to do.

If given arguments, you'll get a SyntaxError exception instead, but the underlying cause is the same:

>>> pip install foobar
  File "<stdin>", line 1
    pip install foobar
              ^
SyntaxError: invalid syntax
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
QuantumMechanic
answered 7 Months ago
54

You could run a thread in the background using the threading module. For example:

def run_progress_bar(finished_event):
    chars = itertools.cycle(r'-|/')
    while not finished_event.is_set():
        sys.stdout.write('rWorking ' + next(chars))
        sys.stdout.flush()
        finished_event.wait(0.2)


# somewhere else...
finished_event = threading.Event()
progress_bar_thread = threading.Thread(target=run_progress_bar, args=(finished_event,))
progress_bar_thread.start()
# do stuff
finished_event.set()
progress_bar_thread.join()
Thursday, August 19, 2021
 
Sanguine
answered 4 Months ago
58

use the following to convert to a timestamp in python 2

int((mod_time.mktime(first_run.timetuple())+first_run.microsecond/1000000.0))

Sunday, August 22, 2021
 
waylaidwanderer
answered 4 Months ago
51

Roll your own shouldn't be too hard.

Create a usercontrol which has the properties of a standard progress bar

Value
Maximum
Minimum

You can create a derived property which calculates the size of the bar by using the a formula:

ProgressBarWidth = (Value / (Maximum + Minimum) * ControlWidth) - Padding

Which changes when the Value, Maximum or Minimum is updated

Bind this to the Width of the 'bar' in your progress bar control template - this way when the Value property is updated, the progress bar will resize.

How your bar looks is up to you, but I guess you just want a load of fancy fills/gradients/glow effects - you can add these in Blend

Disclaimer: Formulas may be incorrect!

In case you want to try and roll your own, here's one I just knocked up which seems to work ok

public partial class MyProgressBar : UserControl
    {
        public MyProgressBar()
        {
            InitializeComponent();

            Loaded += new RoutedEventHandler(MyProgressBar_Loaded);
        }

        void MyProgressBar_Loaded(object sender, RoutedEventArgs e)
        {
            Update();
        }

        private static readonly DependencyProperty MaximumProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Maximum", typeof(double), typeof(MyProgressBar), new PropertyMetadata(100d, OnMaximumChanged));
        public double Maximum
        {
            get { return (double)GetValue(MaximumProperty); }
            set { SetValue(MaximumProperty, value); }
        }


        private static readonly DependencyProperty MinimumProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Minimum", typeof(double), typeof(MyProgressBar), new PropertyMetadata(0d, OnMinimumChanged));
        public double Minimum
        {
            get { return (double)GetValue(MinimumProperty); }
            set { SetValue(MinimumProperty, value); }
        }

        private static readonly DependencyProperty ValueProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("Value", typeof(double), typeof(MyProgressBar), new PropertyMetadata(50d, OnValueChanged));
        public double Value
        {
            get { return (double)GetValue(ValueProperty); }
            set { SetValue(ValueProperty, value); }
        }



        private static readonly DependencyProperty ProgressBarWidthProperty = DependencyProperty.Register("ProgressBarWidth", typeof(double), typeof(MyProgressBar), null);
        private double ProgressBarWidth
        {
            get { return (double)GetValue(ProgressBarWidthProperty); }
            set { SetValue(ProgressBarWidthProperty, value); }
        }

        static void OnValueChanged(DependencyObject o, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            (o as MyProgressBar).Update();
        }

        static void OnMinimumChanged(DependencyObject o, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            (o as MyProgressBar).Update();
        }

        static void OnMaximumChanged(DependencyObject o, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs e)
        {
            (o as MyProgressBar).Update();
        }


        void Update()
        {
            // The -2 is for the borders - there are probably better ways of doing this since you
            // may want your template to have variable bits like border width etc which you'd use
            // TemplateBinding for
            ProgressBarWidth = Math.Min((Value / (Maximum + Minimum) * this.ActualWidth) - 2, this.ActualWidth - 2);


        }          
    }

The XAML

<UserControl x:Class="WpfApplication1.MyProgressBar"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             mc:Ignorable="d" 
             d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300" x:Name="uc">
    <Grid>
        <Border Background="White">
            <Border BorderBrush="Gray" BorderThickness="1">
                <Grid>
                    <Grid.Background>
                        <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
                            <GradientStop Color="#FFE5E5E5" Offset="0" />
                            <GradientStop Color="White" Offset="1" />
                        </LinearGradientBrush>
                    </Grid.Background>
                    <Grid Width="{Binding ProgressBarWidth, ElementName=uc}" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
                        <Grid.Background>
                            <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="1,0.5" StartPoint="0,0.5">
                                <GradientStop Color="#FFCBFFD0" Offset="0" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#FF62EF73" Offset="1" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#FFAEE56D" Offset="0.39" />
                            </LinearGradientBrush>
                        </Grid.Background>
                    </Grid>
                </Grid>
            </Border>
        </Border>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>

The result:

Progress bar... home grown!

Like I said, something like this is pretty easy but still consider redefining the template or using the original since it does support glowyness on the right OS

Here it is after I added a 'Percent' dependency property and bound to that in the control template:

Home grown with number!

Code for updating Percent was

   Percentage = Math.Min((int)(Value / (Maximum + Minimum) * 100), 100);

Edit 2:

I messed with the fills and added a white inner border so it looks more shiny. The only thing missing is the shiny animation

the top one is my control, the bottom one is the default WPF one

Bear in mind, all of this may be possible just by editing the progress bar control template

Oooh shiny...

Here's the updated XAML:

<UserControl x:Class="WpfApplication1.MyProgressBar"
             xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
             xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
             xmlns:mc="http://schemas.openxmlformats.org/markup-compatibility/2006" 
             xmlns:d="http://schemas.microsoft.com/expression/blend/2008" 
             mc:Ignorable="d" 
             d:DesignHeight="300" d:DesignWidth="300" x:Name="uc">
    <Grid>
        <Border Background="White" BorderBrush="Gray" BorderThickness="1">
            <Border BorderBrush="White" BorderThickness="1">
                <Grid>
                    <Grid.Background>
                        <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
                            <GradientStop Color="#FFE5E5E5" Offset="0" />
                            <GradientStop Color="White" Offset="1" />
                        </LinearGradientBrush>
                    </Grid.Background>
                    <Grid Width="{Binding ProgressBarWidth, ElementName=uc, FallbackValue=200}" HorizontalAlignment="Left">
                        <Grid.Background>
                            <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="1,0.5" StartPoint="0,0.5">
                                <GradientStop Color="#FF8BBA91" Offset="0" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#FF8BBA91" Offset="1" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#FF9ED76A" Offset="0.8" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#FF9ED76A" Offset="0.2" />
                            </LinearGradientBrush>
                        </Grid.Background>
                    </Grid>
                    <Border>
                        <Border.Background>
                            <LinearGradientBrush EndPoint="0.5,1" StartPoint="0.5,0">
                                <GradientStop Color="#89E2E2E2" Offset="0" />
                                <GradientStop Color="#C1FFFFFF" Offset="0.5" />
                                <GradientStop Color="Transparent" Offset="0.52" />
                            </LinearGradientBrush>
                        </Border.Background>
                    </Border>
                    <TextBlock HorizontalAlignment="Center" VerticalAlignment="Center" Text="{Binding Percentage, ElementName=uc}"></TextBlock>
                </Grid>
            </Border>
        </Border>
    </Grid>
</UserControl>
Saturday, October 2, 2021
 
AlterPHP
answered 2 Months ago
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