Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   33 times

Consider I have the following text in a UILabel (a long line of dynamic text):

Since the alien army vastly outnumbers the team, players must use the post-apocalyptic world to their advantage, such as seeking cover behind dumpsters, pillars, cars, rubble, and other objects.

I want to resize the UILabel's height so that the text can fit in. I'm using following properties of UILabel to make the text within to wrap.

myUILabel.lineBreakMode = UILineBreakModeWordWrap;
myUILabel.numberOfLines = 0;

Please let me know if I'm not heading in the right direction. Thanks.

 Answers

39

sizeWithFont constrainedToSize:lineBreakMode: is the method to use. An example of how to use it is below:

//Calculate the expected size based on the font and linebreak mode of your label
// FLT_MAX here simply means no constraint in height
CGSize maximumLabelSize = CGSizeMake(296, FLT_MAX);

CGSize expectedLabelSize = [yourString sizeWithFont:yourLabel.font constrainedToSize:maximumLabelSize lineBreakMode:yourLabel.lineBreakMode];   

//adjust the label the the new height.
CGRect newFrame = yourLabel.frame;
newFrame.size.height = expectedLabelSize.height;
yourLabel.frame = newFrame;
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
Bere
answered 7 Months ago
99

I solved this by subclassing UILabel and overriding drawTextInRect: like this:

- (void)drawTextInRect:(CGRect)rect {
    UIEdgeInsets insets = {0, 5, 0, 5};
    [super drawTextInRect:UIEdgeInsetsInsetRect(rect, insets)];
}

Swift 3.1:

override func drawText(in rect: CGRect) {
    let insets = UIEdgeInsets.init(top: 0, left: 5, bottom: 0, right: 5)
    super.drawText(in: UIEdgeInsetsInsetRect(rect, insets))
}

Swift 4.2.1:

override func drawText(in rect: CGRect) {
    let insets = UIEdgeInsets(top: 0, left: 5, bottom: 0, right: 5)
    super.drawText(in: rect.inset(by: insets))
}

As you might have gathered, this is an adaptation of tc.'s answer. It has two advantages over that one:

  1. there's no need to trigger it by sending a sizeToFit message
  2. it leaves the label frame alone - handy if your label has a background and you don't want that to shrink
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
Manju
answered 7 Months ago
69

I've just put this in a playground and it works for me.

Updated for Swift 4.0

import UIKit

 func heightForView(text:String, font:UIFont, width:CGFloat) -> CGFloat{
    let label:UILabel = UILabel(frame: CGRectMake(0, 0, width, CGFloat.greatestFiniteMagnitude))
    label.numberOfLines = 0
    label.lineBreakMode = NSLineBreakMode.byWordWrapping
    label.font = font
    label.text = text

    label.sizeToFit()
    return label.frame.height
}

let font = UIFont(name: "Helvetica", size: 20.0)

var height = heightForView("This is just a load of text", font: font, width: 100.0)

Swift 3:

func heightForView(text:String, font:UIFont, width:CGFloat) -> CGFloat{
    let label:UILabel = UILabel(frame: CGRect(x: 0, y: 0, width: width, height: CGFloat.greatestFiniteMagnitude))
    label.numberOfLines = 0
    label.lineBreakMode = NSLineBreakMode.byWordWrapping
    label.font = font
    label.text = text
    label.sizeToFit()

    return label.frame.height
}

enter image description here

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
ChronoFish
answered 7 Months ago
86

As stated, I had a very annoying problem where custom fonts in a UILabel would get cut off due to something. I later found out it was due to ascenders and descenders (font characteristics).

After much searching I found a solution that required you to download a program, adjust the font's ascender and descender using terminal and then test it out on your app until it's perfect.

This would be fine if I didn't have to do this for 20+ fonts. So I decided to dig around and see if I could access the a font's ascender and descender values. Turns out UIFont has those exact attributes!

With that information, I was able to subclass UILabel and adjust its frame dynamically by adding the ascender and descender values (use absolute value as it is negative) to its height.

Here's a snippet of the implementation code below, the last line is the money line:

UIFont *font = [UIFont fontWithName:nameOfFontUsed size:44.0];
NSDictionary *attrsDict = [NSDictionary dictionaryWithObject:font forKey:NSFontAttributeName];
NSMutableAttributedString *theString = [[NSMutableAttributedString alloc] initWithString:[NSString stringWithFormat:@"%@", enteredString] attributes:attrsDict];

//Add other attributes you desire

NSMutableParagraphStyle *paragraphStyle = [[NSMutableParagraphStyle alloc] init];
paragraphStyle.lineBreakMode = NSLineBreakByCharWrapping;
paragraphStyle.lineHeightMultiple = 5.0;
[theString addAttribute:NSParagraphStyleAttributeName value:paragraphStyle range:NSMakeRange(0, [theString length])];

[self setAttributedText:theString];

[self sizeToFit];

[self setFrame:CGRectMake(self.frame.origin.x, self.frame.origin.y, self.frame.size.width, self.frame.size.height+font.ascender+ABS(font.descender))];
Tuesday, August 10, 2021
 
xenon
answered 4 Months ago
74

userInteractionEnabled is not a method but a property. But I think you will want to set this to YES to allow events to get through to the UIView superview.

What you might want to do is override the touchesBegan:withEvent: method of the UIView that contains your UIButton and UILabel subviews.

Within this method, test if any of the UITouch touches fall inside the bounds of the UILabel.

That is, does the CGPoint element [touch locationInView] intersect with with the CGRect element [infoLabel bounds]? Look into the function CGRectContainsPoint to run this test.

If so, then fire off an NSNotification that calls the same IBAction selector as the UIButton.

Sunday, October 10, 2021
 
Chris Herrera
answered 2 Months ago
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