Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   42 times

I know similar questions have been asked before, but this one is a little different. I have an array of unnamed objects, which contain an array of named objects, and I need to get the object where "name" is "string 1". Here is an example array.

var array = [
    { name:"string 1", value:"this", other: "that" },
    { name:"string 2", value:"this", other: "that" }
];

Update: I should have said this earlier, but once I find it, I want to replace it with an edited object.

 Answers

16

You can loop over the array and test for that property:

function search(nameKey, myArray){
    for (var i=0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
        if (myArray[i].name === nameKey) {
            return myArray[i];
        }
    }
}

var array = [
    { name:"string 1", value:"this", other: "that" },
    { name:"string 2", value:"this", other: "that" }
];

var resultObject = search("string 1", array);
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
cegfault
answered 7 Months ago
10

If you have an array such as

var people = [
  { "name": "bob", "dinner": "pizza" },
  { "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" },
  { "name": "larry", "dinner": "hummus" }
];

You can use the filter method of an Array object:

people.filter(function (person) { return person.dinner == "sushi" });
  // => [{ "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" }]

In newer JavaScript implementations you can use a function expression:

people.filter(p => p.dinner == "sushi")
  // => [{ "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" }]

You can search for people who have "dinner": "sushi" using a map

people.map(function (person) {
  if (person.dinner == "sushi") {
    return person
  } else {
    return null
  }
}); // => [null, { "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" }, null]

or a reduce

people.reduce(function (sushiPeople, person) {
  if (person.dinner == "sushi") {
    return sushiPeople.concat(person);
  } else {
    return sushiPeople
  }
}, []); // => [{ "name": "john", "dinner": "sushi" }]

I'm sure you are able to generalize this to arbitrary keys and values!

Friday, June 11, 2021
 
o_flyer
answered 6 Months ago
37

You can use array#reduce and array#some.

const arr = [
    {label: 'All', value: 'All'},
    {label: 'All', value: 'All'},
    {label: 'Alex', value: 'Ninja'},
    {label: 'Bill', value: 'Op'},
    {label: 'Cill', value: 'iopop'}
]

var result = arr.reduce((unique, o) => {
    if(!unique.some(obj => obj.label === o.label && obj.value === o.value)) {
      unique.push(o);
    }
    return unique;
},[]);
console.log(result);
Wednesday, June 30, 2021
 
fillobotto
answered 6 Months ago
85

Usage: isEqArrays(arr1, arr2)

//
// Array comparsion
//

function inArray(array, el) {
  for ( var i = array.length; i--; ) {
    if ( array[i] === el ) return true;
  }
  return false;
}

function isEqArrays(arr1, arr2) {
  if ( arr1.length !== arr2.length ) {
    return false;
  }
  for ( var i = arr1.length; i--; ) {
    if ( !inArray( arr2, arr1[i] ) ) {
      return false;
    }
  }
  return true;
}
Thursday, July 29, 2021
 
maniclorn
answered 5 Months ago
74

There is Array.filter():

var numbers = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5];
var filtered = numbers.filter(function(x) { return x > 3; });

// As a JavaScript 1.8 expression closure
filtered = numbers.filter(function(x) x > 3);

Note that Array.filter() is not standard ECMAScript, and it does not appear in ECMAScript specs older than ES5 (thanks Yi Jiang and jAndy). As such, it may not be supported by other ECMAScript dialects like JScript (on MSIE).

Nov 2020 Update: Array.filter is now supported across all major browsers.

Saturday, September 4, 2021
 
Amumu
answered 3 Months ago
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