Asked  6 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   23 times

In C and C++, is there a fixed order for evaluation of parameter to the function? I mean, what do the standards say? Is it left-to-right or right-to-left? I am getting confusing information from the books.

Is it necessary that function call should be implemented using stack only? What do the C and C++ standards say about this?

 Answers

29

C and C++ are two completely different languages; don't assume the same rules always apply to both. In the case of parameter evaluation order, however:

C99:

6.5.2.2 Function calls
...
10 The order of evaluation of the function designator, the actual arguments, and subexpressions within the actual arguments is unspecified, but there is a sequence point before the actual call.

[Edit] C11 (draft):

6.5.2.2 Function calls
...
10 There is a sequence point after the evaluations of the function designator and the actual arguments but before the actual call. Every evaluation in the calling function (including other function calls) that is not otherwise specifically sequenced before or after the execution of the body of the called function is indeterminately sequenced with respect to the execution of the called function.94)
...
94) In other words, function executions do not ‘‘interleave’’ with each other.

C++:

5.2.2 Function call
...
8 The order of evaluation of arguments is unspecified. All side effects of argument expression evaluations take effect before the function is entered. The order of evaluation of the postfix expression and the argument expression list is unspecified.

Neither standard mandates the use of the hardware stack for passing function parameters; that's an implementation detail. The C++ standard uses the term "unwinding the stack" to describe calling destructors for automatically created objects on the path from a try block to a throw-expression, but that's it. Most popular architectures do pass parameters via a hardware stack, but it's not universal.

[Edit]

I am getting confusing information from the books.

This is not in the least surprising, since easily 90% of books written about C are simply crap.

While the language standard isn't a great resource for learning either C or C++, it's good to have handy for questions like this. The official™ standards documents cost real money, but there are drafts that are freely available online, and should be good enough for most purposes.

The latest C99 draft (with updates since original publication) is available here. The latest pre-publication C11 draft (which was officially ratified last year) is available here. And a publicly availble draft of the C++ language is available here, although it has an explicit disclaimer that some of the information is incomplete or incorrect.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
DCD
answered 6 Months ago
DCD
96

No, function parameters are not evaluated in a defined order in C.

See Martin York's answers to What are all the common undefined behaviour that c++ programmer should know about?.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
Gregosaurus
answered 6 Months ago
92

extern "C" doesn't really change the way that the compiler reads the code. If your code is in a .c file, it will be compiled as C, if it is in a .cpp file, it will be compiled as C++ (unless you do something strange to your configuration).

What extern "C" does is affect linkage. C++ functions, when compiled, have their names mangled -- this is what makes overloading possible. The function name gets modified based on the types and number of parameters, so that two functions with the same name will have different symbol names.

Code inside an extern "C" is still C++ code. There are limitations on what you can do in an extern "C" block, but they're all about linkage. You can't define any new symbols that can't be built with C linkage. That means no classes or templates, for example.

extern "C" blocks nest nicely. There's also extern "C++" if you find yourself hopelessly trapped inside of extern "C" regions, but it isn't such a good idea from a cleanliness perspective.

Now, specifically regarding your numbered questions:

Regarding #1: __cplusplus will stay defined inside of extern "C" blocks. This doesn't matter, though, since the blocks should nest neatly.

Regarding #2: __cplusplus will be defined for any compilation unit that is being run through the C++ compiler. Generally, that means .cpp files and any files being included by that .cpp file. The same .h (or .hh or .hpp or what-have-you) could be interpreted as C or C++ at different times, if different compilation units include them. If you want the prototypes in the .h file to refer to C symbol names, then they must have extern "C" when being interpreted as C++, and they should not have extern "C" when being interpreted as C -- hence the #ifdef __cplusplus checking.

To answer your question #3: functions without prototypes will have C++ linkage if they are in .cpp files and not inside of an extern "C" block. This is fine, though, because if it has no prototype, it can only be called by other functions in the same file, and then you don't generally care what the linkage looks like, because you aren't planning on having that function be called by anything outside the same compilation unit anyway.

For #4, you've got it exactly. If you are including a header for code that has C linkage (such as code that was compiled by a C compiler), then you must extern "C" the header -- that way you will be able to link with the library. (Otherwise, your linker would be looking for functions with names like _Z1hic when you were looking for void h(int, char)

5: This sort of mixing is a common reason to use extern "C", and I don't see anything wrong with doing it this way -- just make sure you understand what you are doing.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
osondoar
answered 6 Months ago
31

I found something that at least begins to answer my own question. The following two links have wmv files from Microsoft that demonstrate using a C# class in unmanaged C++.

This first one uses a COM object and regasm: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/bb892741.

This second one uses the features of C++/CLI to wrap the C# class: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/bb892742. I have been able to instantiate a c# class from managed code and retrieve a string as in the video. It has been very helpful but it only answers 2/3rds of my question as I want to instantiate a class with a string perimeter into a c# class. As a proof of concept I altered the code presented in the example for the following method, and achieved this goal. Of course I also added a altered the {public string PickDate(string Name)} method to do something with the name string to prove to myself that it worked.

wchar_t * DatePickerClient::pick(std::wstring nme)
{
    IntPtr temp(ref);// system int pointer from a native int
    String ^date;// tracking handle to a string (managed)
    String ^name;// tracking handle to a string (managed)
    name = gcnew String(nme.c_str());
    wchar_t *ret;// pointer to a c++ string
    GCHandle gch;// garbage collector handle
    DatePicker::DatePicker ^obj;// reference the c# object with tracking handle(^)
    gch = static_cast<GCHandle>(temp);// converted from the int pointer 
    obj = static_cast<DatePicker::DatePicker ^>(gch.Target);
    date = obj->PickDate(name);
    ret = new wchar_t[date->Length +1];
    interior_ptr<const wchar_t> p1 = PtrToStringChars(date);// clr pointer that acts like pointer
    pin_ptr<const wchar_t> p2 = p1;// pin the pointer to a location as clr pointers move around in memory but c++ does not know about that.
    wcscpy_s(ret, date->Length +1, p2);
    return ret;
}

Part of my question was: What is better? From what I have read in many many efforts to research the answer is that COM objects are considered easier to use, and using a wrapper instead allows for greater control. In some cases using a wrapper can (but not always) reduce the size of the thunk, as COM objects automatically have a standard size footprint and wrappers are only as big as they need to be.

The thunk (as I have used above) refers to the space time and resources used in between C# and C++ in the case of the COM object, and in between C++/CLI and native C++ in the case of coding-using a C++/CLI Wrapper. So another part of my answer should include a warning that crossing the thunk boundary more than absolutely necessary is bad practice, accessing the thunk boundary inside a loop is not recommended, and that it is possible to set up a wrapper incorrectly so that it double thunks (crosses the boundary twice where only one thunk is called for) without the code seeming to be incorrect to a novice like me.

Two notes about the wmv's. First: some footage is reused in both, don't be fooled. At first they seem the same but they do cover different topics. Second, there are some bonus features such as marshalling that are now a part of the CLI that are not covered in the wmv's.

Edit:

Note there is a consequence for your installs, your c++ wrapper will not be found by the CLR. You will have to either confirm that the c++ application installs in any/every directory that uses it, or add the library (which will then need to be strongly named) to the GAC at install time. This also means that with either case in development environments you will likely have to copy the library to each directory where applications call it.

Wednesday, June 2, 2021
 
DiglettPotato
answered 6 Months ago
34

From the C++ standard:

The order of evaluation of arguments is unspecified. All side effects of argument expression evaluations take effect before the function is entered. The order of evaluation of the postfix expression and the argument expression list is unspecified.

However, your example would only have undefined behavior if the arguments were x>>=2 and x<<=2, such that x were being modified.

Sunday, June 20, 2021
 
zIs
answered 6 Months ago
zIs
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