Asked  6 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   72 times

My question is similar to this MySQL question, but intended for SQL Server:

Is there a function or a query that will return a list of days between two dates? For example, lets say there is a function called ExplodeDates:

SELECT ExplodeDates('2010-01-01', '2010-01-13');

This would return a single column table with the values:

2010-01-01
2010-01-02
2010-01-03
2010-01-04
2010-01-05
2010-01-06
2010-01-07
2010-01-08
2010-01-09
2010-01-10
2010-01-11
2010-01-12
2010-01-13

I'm thinking that a calendar/numbers table might be able to help me here.


Update

I decided to have a look at the three code answers provided, and the results of the execution - as a % of the total batch - are:

  • Rob Farley's answer : 18%
  • StingyJack's answer : 41%
  • KM's answer : 41%

Lower is better

I have accepted Rob Farley's answer, as it was the fastest, even though numbers table solutions (used by both KM and StingyJack in their answers) are something of a favourite of mine. Rob Farley's was two-thirds faster.

Update 2

Alivia's answer is much more succinct. I have changed the accepted answer.

 Answers

88

this few lines are the simple answer for this question in sql server.

WITH mycte AS
(
  SELECT CAST('2011-01-01' AS DATETIME) DateValue
  UNION ALL
  SELECT  DateValue + 1
  FROM    mycte   
  WHERE   DateValue + 1 < '2021-12-31'
)

SELECT  DateValue
FROM    mycte
OPTION (MAXRECURSION 0)
Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
macha
answered 6 Months ago
30

I would use this stored procedure to generate the intervals you need into the temp table named time_intervals, then JOIN and aggregate your data table with the temp time_intervals table.

The procedure can generate intervals of all the different types you see specified in it:

call make_intervals('2009-01-01 00:00:00','2009-01-10 00:00:00',1,'DAY')
.
select * from time_intervals  
.
interval_start      interval_end        
------------------- ------------------- 
2009-01-01 00:00:00 2009-01-01 23:59:59 
2009-01-02 00:00:00 2009-01-02 23:59:59 
2009-01-03 00:00:00 2009-01-03 23:59:59 
2009-01-04 00:00:00 2009-01-04 23:59:59 
2009-01-05 00:00:00 2009-01-05 23:59:59 
2009-01-06 00:00:00 2009-01-06 23:59:59 
2009-01-07 00:00:00 2009-01-07 23:59:59 
2009-01-08 00:00:00 2009-01-08 23:59:59 
2009-01-09 00:00:00 2009-01-09 23:59:59 
.
call make_intervals('2009-01-01 00:00:00','2009-01-01 02:00:00',10,'MINUTE')
. 
select * from time_intervals
.  
interval_start      interval_end        
------------------- ------------------- 
2009-01-01 00:00:00 2009-01-01 00:09:59 
2009-01-01 00:10:00 2009-01-01 00:19:59 
2009-01-01 00:20:00 2009-01-01 00:29:59 
2009-01-01 00:30:00 2009-01-01 00:39:59 
2009-01-01 00:40:00 2009-01-01 00:49:59 
2009-01-01 00:50:00 2009-01-01 00:59:59 
2009-01-01 01:00:00 2009-01-01 01:09:59 
2009-01-01 01:10:00 2009-01-01 01:19:59 
2009-01-01 01:20:00 2009-01-01 01:29:59 
2009-01-01 01:30:00 2009-01-01 01:39:59 
2009-01-01 01:40:00 2009-01-01 01:49:59 
2009-01-01 01:50:00 2009-01-01 01:59:59 
.
I specified an interval_start and interval_end so you can aggregate the 
data timestamps with a "between interval_start and interval_end" type of JOIN.
.
Code for the proc:
.
-- drop procedure make_intervals
.
CREATE PROCEDURE make_intervals(startdate timestamp, enddate timestamp, intval integer, unitval varchar(10))
BEGIN
-- *************************************************************************
-- Procedure: make_intervals()
--    Author: Ron Savage
--      Date: 02/03/2009
--
-- Description:
-- This procedure creates a temporary table named time_intervals with the
-- interval_start and interval_end fields specifed from the startdate and
-- enddate arguments, at intervals of intval (unitval) size.
-- *************************************************************************
   declare thisDate timestamp;
   declare nextDate timestamp;
   set thisDate = startdate;

   -- *************************************************************************
   -- Drop / create the temp table
   -- *************************************************************************
   drop temporary table if exists time_intervals;
   create temporary table if not exists time_intervals
      (
      interval_start timestamp,
      interval_end timestamp
      );

   -- *************************************************************************
   -- Loop through the startdate adding each intval interval until enddate
   -- *************************************************************************
   repeat
      select
         case unitval
            when 'MICROSECOND' then timestampadd(MICROSECOND, intval, thisDate)
            when 'SECOND'      then timestampadd(SECOND, intval, thisDate)
            when 'MINUTE'      then timestampadd(MINUTE, intval, thisDate)
            when 'HOUR'        then timestampadd(HOUR, intval, thisDate)
            when 'DAY'         then timestampadd(DAY, intval, thisDate)
            when 'WEEK'        then timestampadd(WEEK, intval, thisDate)
            when 'MONTH'       then timestampadd(MONTH, intval, thisDate)
            when 'QUARTER'     then timestampadd(QUARTER, intval, thisDate)
            when 'YEAR'        then timestampadd(YEAR, intval, thisDate)
         end into nextDate;

      insert into time_intervals select thisDate, timestampadd(MICROSECOND, -1, nextDate);
      set thisDate = nextDate;
   until thisDate >= enddate
   end repeat;

 END;

Similar example data scenario at the bottom of this post, where I built a similar function for SQL Server.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021
 
Owen
answered 6 Months ago
64

Try to add new Date(i), instead of just i:

function dateList(dateStart, dateEnd) {
  var dates = [];
  for (i = dateStart; i <= dateEnd; i.setDate(i.getDate() + 1)){
    dates.push(new Date(i));
  }
  return dates;
}

console.log(dateList(new Date('2017-05-08'), new Date('2017-05-12')));
Wednesday, September 1, 2021
 
Sujith
answered 3 Months ago
92

See https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/functions/datediff-transact-sql?view=sql-server-ver15#return-value

For millisecond, the maximum difference between startdate and enddate is 24 days, 20 hours, 31 minutes and 23.647 seconds.

If you need millisecond above that level, you'll need to write something custom.

Saturday, September 25, 2021
 
zerzer
answered 2 Months ago
28

The root cause of the problem is this:

  • the data type DATE has a range of accepted values from 01-01-0001 through 12-31-9999
  • the data type DATETIME has a range of accepted values from 01-01-1753 through 12-31-9999

So if you happen to have a DATE from before 1753, or an empty / NULL value - this will be outside the range that DATETIME can handle.

You should stop using DATETIME In SQL Server 2008 and newer. Use DATETIME2(n) instead (where n stands for the number of fractional seconds you need).

So try this:

select * 
from tableA 
inner join tableB on tableA.id = tableB.aid 
                  and cast(a.date AS DATETIME2(3)) = CAST('2015-08-24' AS DATETIME2(3)) 

and I'm sure this'll work just fine.

Sunday, October 10, 2021
 
WhatIsHTML
answered 2 Months ago
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