Asked  8 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   40 times

I have tried switching from a previous Post request to a Get request. Which assumes its a Get but eventually does a post.

I tried the following in PHP :

curl_setopt($curl_handle, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS, null);
curl_setopt($curl_handle, CURLOPT_POST, FALSE);
curl_setopt($curl_handle, CURLOPT_HTTPGET, TRUE);

What am I missing?

Additional information: I already have a connection that's setup to do a POST request. That completes successfully but later on when I try to reuse the connection and switch back to GET using the setopts above it still ends up doing a POST internally with incomplete POST headers. The problem is it believes its doing a GET but ends up putting a POST header without the content-length parameter and the connection fails witha 411 ERROR.

 Answers

80

Solved: The problem lies here:

I set POST via both _CUSTOMREQUEST and _POST and the _CUSTOMREQUEST persisted as POST while _POST switched to _HTTPGET. The Server assumed the header from _CUSTOMREQUEST to be the right one and came back with a 411.

curl_setopt($curl_handle, CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, 'POST');
Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
JakeGR
answered 8 Months ago
50

PUT

$data = array('username'=>'dog','password'=>'tall');
$data_json = json_encode($data);

$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER, array('Content-Type: application/json','Content-Length: ' . strlen($data_json)));
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, 'PUT');
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS,$data_json);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$response  = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

POST

$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_HTTPHEADER, array('Content-Type: application/json'));
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POST, 1);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS,$data_json);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$response  = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);

GET See @Dan H answer

DELETE

$ch = curl_init();
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_URL, $url);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, "DELETE");
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_POSTFIELDS,$data_json);
curl_setopt($ch, CURLOPT_RETURNTRANSFER, true);
$response  = curl_exec($ch);
curl_close($ch);
Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
xenon
answered 8 Months ago
87

CURLOPT_POSTREDIR can be set to configure this behaviour (request method for 301 location header based automatic redirects in curl):

curl_setopt( , CURLOPT_POSTREDIR, 3);

here 3 tells curl module to redirect both 301 as well as 302 requests.

0,1,2,3 are the valid options for the last argument.

0 -> do not set any behavior
1 -> follow redirect with the same type of request only for 301 redirects.
2 -> follow redirect with the same type of request only for 302 redirects.
3 -> follow redirect with the same type of request both for 301 and 302 redirects.

See as well: Request #49571 CURLOPT_POSTREDIR not implemented which has some useful comments, like setting a custom request method:

curl_setopt( $ch, CURLOPT_CUSTOMREQUEST, "POST"); 
Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
FWH
answered 8 Months ago
FWH
42

You could separate your $_SESSION superglobal into arrays describing both the current user/session and any errors that your form has created. For instance,

$_SESSION = array(
  'user' => array(), // user data goes here
  'errors' => array() // validation data goes here
);

if (!$_POST['myvar'] == 'something') {
  $_SESSION['errors']['myvar'] = 'You must specify a value for <code>myvar</code>';
}

You would then be able to output errors on subsequent pages using a call something like this:

if (isset($_SESSION['errors'])) {
  foreach($_SESSION['errors'] as $error) {
    echo '<li>' . $error . '</li>';
  }
}
Saturday, May 29, 2021
 
nasty
answered 5 Months ago
84

PHP has the string increment operator that does exactly that:

for($x = 'A'; $x < 'ZZ'; $x++)
    echo $x, ' ';

Result:

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z AA AB AC AD AE AF... 

Ref:

PHP follows Perl's convention when dealing with arithmetic operations on character variables and not C's. For example, in PHP and Perl $a = 'Z'; $a++; turns $a into 'AA', while in C a = 'Z'; a++; turns a into '[' (ASCII value of 'Z' is 90, ASCII value of '[' is 91). Note that character variables can be incremented but not decremented and even so only plain ASCII alphabets and digits (a-z, A-Z and 0-9) are supported. Incrementing/decrementing other character variables has no effect, the original string is unchanged.

http://php.net/manual/en/language.operators.increment.php

Saturday, July 31, 2021
 
Shawson
answered 3 Months ago
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