Asked  7 Months ago    Answers:  5   Viewed   50 times

PHP 7 introduces return type declarations. Which means I can now indicate the return value is a certain class, interface, array, callable or one of the newly hintable scalar types, as is possible for function parameters.

function returnHello(): string {
    return 'hello';
}

Often it happens that a value is not always present, and that you might return either something of some type, or null. While you can make parameters nullable by setting their default to null (DateTime $time = null), there does not appear to be a way to do this for return types. Is that indeed the case, or am I somehow not finding how to do it? These do not work:

function returnHello(): string? {
    return 'hello';
}

function returnHello(): string|null {
    return 'hello';
}

 Answers

82

PHP 7.1 Now supports nullable return types. The first RFC I linked to is the one they went for:

function nullOrString(int $foo) : ?string
{
    return $foo%2 ? "odd" : null;
}

old answer:

Since my comment was actually an answer to the question:

PHP 7 won't support nullable return-types just yet, but there's an RFC out to address just that, it aims to land in PHP 7.1. If it passes, the syntax would then affect all type-hints (both return types and type-hints):

public function returnStringOrNull(?array $optionalArray) : ?string
{
    if ($optionalArray) {
        return implode(', ', $optionalArray);//string returned here
    }
    return null;
}

There's also a competing RFC to add union types, which would be able to do the same thing, but would look different:

public function returnStringOrNull(array|null $optionalArray) : string|null
{
    if ($optionalArray) {
        return implode(', ', $optionalArray);//string returned here
    }
    return null;
}

For now, though, you'll have to write:

public function returnStringOrNull( array $optionalArray = null)
{
    if ($optionalArray) {
        return implode(', ', $optionalArray);
    }
}

Or just return an empty string to be consistent with the return type, and check falsy value:

public function returnStringOrNull( array $optionalArray = null) : string
{
    if ($optionalArray) {
        return implode(', ', $optionalArray);
    }
    return '';
}
//call
$string = $x->returnStringOrNull();
if (!$string) {
    $string = $x->returnStringOrNull(range(1, 10));
}
Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
DilbertDave
answered 7 Months ago
55

Void return types are for PHP 7.1 (which had not yet been released when you asked this). From the RFC

Version: 0.2.1
Date: 2015-02-14 (v0.1, later withdrawn), 2015-10-14 (v0.2, revival)
Author: Andrea Faulds, ajf@ajf.me
Status: Implemented (PHP 7.1)

Wednesday, March 31, 2021
 
rblarsen
answered 7 Months ago
62

The former is correct, if arg accepts an instance of CustomClass:

def FuncA(arg: CustomClass):
    #     ^ instance of CustomClass

In case you want the class CustomClass itself (or a subtype), then you should write:

from typing import Type  # you have to import Type

def FuncA(arg: Type[CustomClass]):
    #     ^ CustomClass (class object) itself

Like it is written in the documentation about Typing:

class typing.Type(Generic[CT_co])

A variable annotated with C may accept a value of type C. In contrast, a variable annotated with Type[C] may accept values that are classes themselves - specifically, it will accept the class object of C.

The documentation includes an example with the int class:

a = 3         # Has type 'int'
b = int       # Has type 'Type[int]'
c = type(a)   # Also has type 'Type[int]'
Wednesday, June 2, 2021
 
astaykov
answered 5 Months ago
47

You were very close. Just write your method like this:

[return: MaybeNull]
public T Get<T>(string key)
{
    var wrapper = cacheService.Get(key);
    return wrapper.HasValue ? Deserialize<T>(wrapper) : default!;
}

You have to use the default! to get rid of the warning. But you can tell the compiler with [return: MaybeNull] that it should check for null even if it's a non-nullable type.

In that case, the dev may get a warning (depends on flow analytics) if he uses your method and does not check for null.

For further info, see Microsoft documentation: Specify post-conditions: MaybeNull and NotNull

Thursday, June 3, 2021
 
Anax
answered 5 Months ago
53

Ok, this is the right way if you want to have proper types:

type CustomType = { lowercase: TypeOfTheProperty };
// Sorry I cannot deduce type of this.validationMessages.lowercase,
// I would have to see the whole class. I guess it's something
// like Array<string> or string, but I'm not Angular guy, just guessing.

private lowercaseValidator(c: FormControl): CustomType | null {
    return /[a-z]/g.test(c.value) ? null : { lowercase: this.validationMessages.lowercase };
}

More general example

type CustomType = { lowercase: Array<string> };

class A {
      private obj: Array<string>;

      constructor() {
            this.obj = Array<string>();
            this.obj.push("apple");
            this.obj.push("bread");
      }

      public testMethod(b: boolean): CustomType | null {
            return b ? null : { lowercase: this.obj };
      }
}

let a = new A();
let customObj: CustomType | null = a.testMethod(false);
// If you're using strictNullChecks, you must write both CustomType and null
// If you're not CustomType is sufficiant
Sunday, September 19, 2021
 
godot
answered 1 Month ago
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